Skip to content

The Evolution of the Reconstituted 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), 1943

December 2, 2014

by Mark W. Tonner

Beginning in January 1943, the Canadian Army Overseas underwent an extensive reorganization of the formations and units serving within the First Canadian Army, then in the United Kingdom. This reorganization was carried out to bring them in line with the organizations used by British Army formations and units, so that they would be compatible in forthcoming joint operations on the European Continent. Part of this reorganization, was the reorganization of Canada’s two armoured divisions (the 4th and 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions), from each armoured division consisting of two armoured brigades1 and a divisional support group2, to that of each consisting of one armoured brigade3 and one infantry brigade4 and divisional supporting arms and services5. During this reorganization process, the 4th Canadian Armoured Division, went from consisting of the 3rd and 4th Canadian Armoured Brigades, and the 4th Canadian Armoured Divisional Support Group, and divisional supporting services to that of consisting of the 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade, and the 10th Canadian Infantry Brigade, and divisional supporting arms and services. The organization of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division, changed from that of consisting of the 1st and 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigades, and the 5th Canadian Armoured Divisional Support Group, and divisional supporting services, to that of consisting of the 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade6, and the 11th Canadian Infantry Brigade7, and divisional supporting arms and services.

In the ensuing reorganization of these two armoured divisions, six Canadian armoured regiments were displaced. Two of these regiments were converted and redesignated armoured reconnaissance regiments, with one each being assigned to the 4th and 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions8. One regiment was converted and redesignated a tank delivery regiment9, the remaining three armoured regiments, the 6th Canadian Armoured Regiment (1st Hussars), the 10th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), and the 27th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment), were converted to army tank regiments, and redesignated, the 6th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (1st Hussars), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 10th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 27th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, with effect from 15 January 1943. These three army tank regiments became component units of the newly formed 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade10, which was formed in the United Kingdom under the authority of the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, First Canadian Army, Lieutenant-General A.G.L. McNaughton, with effect from 1 January 1943.

The formation in January 1943, of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, comprising the three armoured regiments (converted to army tank regiments) which had become surplus to requirements because of the reorganization of the 4th and 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions, was on a purely temporary basis only. It was hoped that it might be possible to include these three regiments in the order of battle as a third army tank brigade, within First Canadian Army, so that there would be one army tank brigade each, with which to support the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Canadian Infantry Divisions11. The 1st Canadian Army Tank Brigade12, was already in the United Kingdom, having arrived in July 1941, and the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade13, was in Canada awaiting shipping space for transfer to the United Kingdom. By the end of March 1943, it had become apparent that it would be impossible to include all three army tank brigades in the First Canadian Army, although Lieutenant-General A.G.L. McNaughton, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, First Canadian Army, was convinced that at least two would be sufficient. As early as 25 January 1943, it had been agreed that 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, which was composed of regiments that had been overseas longer, would have preference over the regiments of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, which at that time, were still in Canada14. Accordingly, at a meeting held at First Canadian Army Headquarters, on 3 May 1943, it was proposed that 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, be added to the order of battle of First Canadian Army, and that upon its arrival in the United Kingdom, the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade be retained, with the expectation that it would eventually be broken up, with its personnel being used as Canadian Armoured Corps reinforcements.

This proposal met with opposition from Army Headquarters (National Defence Headquarters) in Ottawa, who wanted the second army tank brigade included in the order of battle of First Canadian Army, to be called the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, as this was the army tank brigade, that had been authorized under Privy Council Order Number 45/2757 of 11 April 1942, with effect from 26 January 1942, whereas, the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, had not been authorized under a Privy Council Order15. However, in a telegram of 11 May 1943, Army Headquarters (National Defence Headquarters), let it be known, that they had no objections to the present three army tank regiments16 of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, being those that comprised the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, once the brigade arrived in the United Kingdom.

At a meeting held at First Canadian Army Headquarters on 15 June 1943, the decision was taken, that once the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, had arrived in the United Kingdom, the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, would be disbanded, and that the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade would be reformed from the three most suitable of the six Canadian army tank regiments of either brigade. In a further meeting held at First Canadian Army Headquarters on 26 June 1943, it was agreed that the army tank brigades would be reorganized as armoured brigades, of three armoured regiments each, but without an infantry (Motor) battalion17. This decision was taken to facilitate the replacement of either the 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade, or the 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade, in the 4th and 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions, respectively, if the need to do so was ever required.

With the arrival in the United Kingdom on 24 June 1943, of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, composed of the 20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters), Canadian Armoured Corps, the question of which of the two army tank brigades (2nd or 3rd), should fill the ‘authorized’ army tank brigade position in the First Canadian Army order of battle, became more urgent. In response to this question, and in line with the decision that was taken on 15 June 1943, First Canadian Army Headquarters decided that a comprehensive competitive test of operational capability would be held between the army tank regiments of both army tank brigades to determine the three most suitable of the six Canadian army tank regiments of either brigade, that would make up the composition of the ‘authorized’ army tank brigade position in the First Canadian Army order of battle. Lieutenant-General H.D.G. Crerar, General Officer Commanding, I Canadian Corps18, and his Corps’ headquarters staff, was appointed to carry out this comprehensive competitive test of operational capability, which took place in early July 1943.

In the end, the three army tank regiments of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade (6th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (1st Hussars), 10th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), and 27th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment)), scored higher then those of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade (20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), and 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)), and were chosen (on 12 July 1943) to be the three army tank regiments which would comprise the ‘authorized’ army tank brigade (the 2nd) position in the First Canadian Army order of battle.

The resulting reorganization of these two army tank brigades was rather involved. Following the release of the test results on 12 July 1943, the three army tank regiments of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade (20th, 23rd, and 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiments), became components of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade (with effect from 21 July 1943). Those of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade (6th, 10th, and 27th Canadian Army Tank Regiments) became components of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, which was converted and redesignated the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), with effect from 22 July 1943 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944). The 6th, 10th, and 27th Canadian Army Tank Regiments, Canadian Armoured Corps, were reorganized and redesignated, the 6th Canadian Armoured Regiment (1st Hussars), the 10th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), and the 27th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, respectively, and were allocated to the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), under the authority of the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, First Canadian Army, with effect from 22 July 1943. The personnel of Headquarters, 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, would now function as Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, until such time as the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade was officially disbanded. The personnel of Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, would function as Headquarters, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), until such time as the final selection of personnel to form this headquarters was completed.

The services of the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, were also allocated to the newly formed 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), with the following conversions and redesignations taking place:

– the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade Signals, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, was converted and redesignated, the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Signals, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, with effect from 22 July 1943 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944)

– the 2nd Canadian Tank Brigade Workshop, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, was converted and redesignated, the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps19, with effect from 22 July 1943 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944)

– No. 2 Canadian Army Tank Brigade Sub-Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, was converted and redesignated, No. 2 Canadian Tank Brigade Sub-Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps20, with effect from 22 July 1943 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944)

– No. 84 Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, which had been employed as the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, was allocated to the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), to serve as the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, with effect from 22 July 1943. No. 17 Canadian Light Field Ambulance, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, was also allocated to the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), from the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, with effect from 22 July 1943.

Thus, by the end of July 1943, the newly formed 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), under the command of Brigadier N.A. Gianelli, was composed of 21:

– Headquarters, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent)

– 6th Canadian Armoured Regiment (1st Hussars), Canadian Armoured Corps

– 10th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps

– 27th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps

– 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Signals, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals

– No. 84 Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, employed as the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps

– No. 17 Canadian Light Field Ambulance, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps

– 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps

– No. 2 Canadian Tank Brigade Sub-Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps

This would remain the basic composition of the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), with the exception of the allocation of 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop to the Corps of Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, in May 1944 (see Note 19), and the conversion and redesignation of No. 2 Canadian Tank Brigade Sub-Park, to that of 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Ordnance Field Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps in February 1944 (see Note 20), to the end of hostilities in North-West Europe, in May 1945. Shortly after formation in the summer of 1943, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), along with the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, passed from under First Canadian Army control, to that of Second British Army control, in preparation for the forthcoming invasion of North-West Europe, during which, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), in support of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division assault landing on the Normandy coast, landed on 6 June 1944. From 6 June 1944, to the end of hostilities in North-West Europe, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent) was involved in active operations in support of formations and units of both the First Canadian Army, and the Second British Army. From its formation, through to the disbandment (effective 25 June 1945) of Headquarters, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), the brigade was commanded in succession by, Brigadier N.A. Gianelli (22 July 1943 to 23 March 1944), Brigadier R.A. Wyman (15 April to 8 August 1944), Brigadier J.F. Bingham (9 August to 8 December 1944), and Brigadier G.W. Robinson (9 December 1944 to 25 June 1945).

As mentioned earlier, with effect from 21 July 1943, the former army tank regiments of the original 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, the 20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), the 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), and the 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)), were transferred to under command of Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade. These units, under Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade continued to exist on a temporary basis, under command of Headquarters, “E” Group, Canadian Reinforcement Units (in the United Kingdom)22. They were gradually reduced to nil strength, as their personnel were absorbed as reinforcements for other Canadian Armoured Corps units. However, before they were formally disbanded, Brigadier T.J. Rutherford, Officer Commanding, “E” Group, Canadian Reinforcement Units, in turn, addressed the officers and men of the 20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), the 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), and the 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)). During his address to the officers and men of each unit, he stressed the reluctance with which the decision to replace the army tank regiments of the original 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, with those of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, had been taken and the desire of all concerned to make the best possible provision for the officers and men of these units, who were thus displaced. By the end of October 1943, with the component army tank regiments of the 3rd Army Tank Brigade, having all been reduced to nil strength, Headquarters, 3rd Army Tank Brigade, the 20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters), Canadian Armoured Corps, were all formally disbanded with effect from 1 November 1943, under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944.

With the final disbandment of the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade in November, the reorganization of Canadian Armoured Corps formations, serving with the Canadian Army Overseas, which had begin in January 1943, were now complete. From this point on, the Canadian Armoured Corps formations serving with the Canadian Army Overseas were the 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), the 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade (of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division), and the 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade (of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division).


Acknowledgements:

The author wishes to thank Miss Courtney Carrier, for proof reading and offering constructive criticism, and comments, on my draft copy of this article, and Clive M. Law, for publishing this article.

Bibliography:

Canadian Military Headquarters, Historical Officer, Report No. 110 – Situation of the Canadian Military Forces Overseas, Autumn, 1943: II. and Growth of the Canadian Army Overseas, October 1942 – October 1943. Dated 20 December 1943. Directorate of History and Heritage, National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Ontario.

Canadian Military Headquarters, Historical Officer, Report No. 133 – The Organization of the Canadian Reinforcement Units (United Kingdom): Historical Outline, 1940-45. Dated 29 March 1945. Directorate of History and Heritage, National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Ontario.

Canadian Military Headquarters, Historical Officer, Report No. 168 – The Organization of First Canadian Army. Dated 12 December 1946. Directorate of History and Heritage, National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Ontario.

Grodzinski, JR, Operational Handbook for the First Canadian Army, Formation Organization, Staff Technique and Administration (Revised Edition), The Regimental Historian, 1996, Revised 1998.

Marteinson, J, and McNorgan, MR, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps, An Illustrated History, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps Assoication, in cooperation with the Canadian War Museum, Robin Brass Studio Inc., Kitchener, Ontario, 2000.

McNorgan, MR, and Crossley, GT, Facta Non Verba, A History of the Fort Garry Horse, The Fort Garry Horse Foundation, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 2012.

Tonner, MW, On Active Service, A summary listing of all units of the Canadian Army called out and placed on active service, Service Publications, Ottawa, Ontario, 2008.

Wallace, MC, JF, Dragons of Steel, Canadian Armour in Two World Wars, General Store Publishing House, Burnstown, Ontario, 1995.

Notes:

  1. Consisting of three armoured regiments of the Canadian Armoured Corps, and an infantry (Motor) battalion of the Canadian Infantry Corps.
  1. Consisting of a field regiment, an anti-tank regiment, and a light anti-aircraft regiment, all of the Royal Canadian Artillery, and an infantry battalion of the Canadian Infantry Corps.
  1. Consisting of three armoured regiments of the Canadian Armoured Corps, and an infantry (Motor) battalion of the Canadian Infantry Corps.
  1. Consisting of three infantry battalions of the Canadian Infantry Corps.
  1. Consisting of units of the Royal Canadian Artillery, Royal Canadian Engineers, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, Royal Canadian Army Pay Corps, Canadian Dental Corps, Canadian Postal Corps, Canadian Provost Corps, and the Canadian Intelligence Corps.
  1. Headquarters, 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade, was formed from the redesignation of Headquarters, 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (formerly of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division), with effect from 1 January 1943.
  1. Headquarters, 11th Canadian Infantry Brigade, was formed from the conversion and redesignation of Headquarters, 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade (formerly of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division), with effect from 1 January 1943.
  1. The 29th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The South Alberta Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, was converted and redesignated the 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The South Alberta Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, and was allocated to the 4th Canadian Armoured Division, and the 3rd Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Governor General’s Horse Guards), Canadian Armoured Corps, was converted and redesignated the 3rd Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The Governor General’s Horse Guards), Canadian Armoured Corps, and was allocated to the 5th Canadian Armoured Division, both with effect from 1 January 1943.
  1. The 25th Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Elgin Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, was converted and redesignated the 25th Canadian Tank Delivery Regiment (The Elgin Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, with effect from 15 September 1943. A tank delivery regiment held tanks and Canadian Armoured Corps reinforcements to replace both tank and personnel (crew) casualties in armoured units.
  1. Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, was formed from the conversion and redesignation of Headquarters, 3rd Canadian Armoured Brigade (formerly of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division), with effect from 1 January 1943.
  1. Lieutenant-General A.G.L. McNaughton, General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, First Canadian Army, had made his thoughts known as early as 21 December 1942, that he wanted three army tank brigades included in the order of battle of First Canadian Army, in a cable he had sent to Lieutenant-General K. Stuart, Chief of the General Staff, Army Headquarters (Ottawa), in which he proposed that First Canadian Army be composed of two corps (I and II), with three infantry divisions (1st, 2nd, and 3rd) (of three infantry brigades each), two armoured divisions (4th and 5th) (of one armoured and one infantry brigade each), and three army tank brigades (1st, 2nd, and 3rd).
  1. Composed of the 11th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Ontario Regiment (Tank)), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 12th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Three Rivers Regiment (Tank)), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 14th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment (Tank)), Canadian Armoured Corps.
  1. Composed of the 20th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (16/22 Saskatchewan Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 23rd Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Halifax Rifles), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 26th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (Grey and Simcoe Foresters), Canadian Armoured Corps.
  1. It was however agreed, in a conversation between Lieutenant-Generals McNaughton (General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, First Canadian Army), and Stuart (Chief of the General Staff, Army Headquarters (Ottawa)), on 25 January 1943, that 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, should have priority over the 2nd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, in joining the order of battle of the First Canadian Army.
  1. The 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade, was however eventually authorized under Privy Council Order Number 50/4120 of 19 May 1943, with effect from 1 January 1943.
  1. The 6th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (1st Hussars), Canadian Armoured Corps, the 10th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), Canadian Armoured Corps, and the 27th Canadian Army Tank Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps.
  1. Subsequently, the 1st Canadian Army Tank Brigade, was redesignated the 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), with effect from 26 August 1943 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 67/621 of 2 February 1944), with it’s three component army tank regiments being converted and redesignated armoured regiments, effective 26 August 1943.
  1. 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade had been attached to I Canadian Corps, for administrative purposes only, since 1 June 1943.
  1. The 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, was redesignated the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop, Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and was allocated to the Corps of Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, with effect from 15 May 1944, under the authority of Canadian Military Headquarters Administrative Order Number 85 of 1944.
  1. No. 2 Canadian Tank Brigade Sub-Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, was subsequently converted and redesignated the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade Ordnance Field Park, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, with effect from 7 February 1944 (under the authority of Privy Council Order Number 62/4729 of 20 June 1944).
  1. In late 1943, “C” Squadron, 25th Canadian Tank Delivery Regiment (The Elgin Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps, later converted and redesignated “C” Squadron, 25th Canadian Armoured Delivery Regiment (The Elgin Regiment), Canadian Armoured Corps (with effect from 15 March 1944), was attached to the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (Independent), as the brigade’s tank/armoured delivery squadron, in which role they were employed until the end of hostilities in North-West Europe.
  1. “E” Group, Canadian Reinforcement Units, consisted of Headquarters, “E” Group, Canadian Reinforcement Units, No. 1 Canadian Armoured Corps Reinforcement Unit, No. 2 Canadian Armoured Corps Reinforcement Unit, and the 3rd Canadian Armoured Corps Reinforcement Unit.

 You can rate this article by clicking on the stars below

From → Organization

Leave a Comment

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: